Will back from Himalaya adventure

An 18-year-old Norfolk student has just returned from a research trip exploring the rugged terrain in one of the most remote regions in the Indian Himalayas.

An 18-year-old Norfolk student has just returned from a research trip exploring the rugged terrain in one of the most remote regions in the Indian Himalayas.

Will Sandcraft, from Carbrooke, spent six weeks on a scientific and mountaineering expedition in the remote wilderness of Ladakh which he described as an amazing experience and an incredible journey.

The former Wayalnd Community High School pupil was one of just 42 students from across the country to be chosen for the challenge organised by the British Schools Exploring Society.

Throughout the trip the team did research for medical and mountaineering organisations. They carried out high altitude physiological studies as well as doing ecology fieldwork which involved studying plant diversity and the different types of insects and animals at various altitudes.


You may also want to watch:


One of the biggest challenges Will said he faced was climbing to the summit of Samgyal which is 5810m.

He said: “It took five hours to go up and five hours to go down. It was exhausting but I felt a big sense of achievement getting to the top.”

Most Read

He said he also enjoyed learning about the lives of the sherpas who accompanied the group.

“One of them welcomed us into his home and the hospitality his family showed us was phenomenal, a great insight into their culture,” he said.

Will now wants to train to be an expedition group leader and said one of the places he would like to explore next is the Amazon.

He has just finished two years of studying A-levels at Gordonstoun School in Scotland which counts Prince Charles and author William Boyd among its alumni, and now Will is heading to Nottingham University to study physics.

Prior to the trip Will had trained for two years with the Gordonstoun Mountain Rescue Service in the highlands of Scotland.

He was also the winner in the educational achiever category of this year's Bernard Matthews Youth Awards, supported by the EDP and the Duke of Edinburgh's Award, and he used his �1,000 prize money to buy equipment for his trip to the Himalayas.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus