Slump may hit countywide homes plans

The slump in the housing market and lack of infrastructure means thousands of new homes planned for parts of Norfolk may not be built for at least another 10 years, according to a report by planners.

The slump in the housing market and lack of infrastructure means thousands of new homes planned for parts of Norfolk may not be built for at least another 10 years, according to a report by planners.

While there is the space to build new homes, serious infrastructure constraints in town such as Attleborough and Thetford need to be overcome before many new homes can be built, it says.

Limited capacity in high schools and water resources means a projected 1,894 new homes for Dereham is more likely to be just 600 and a planned 6,507 new homes for Attleborough a more realistic 4,000.

Market conditions would also effect how many new homes were built and the problem was not restricted to towns, the report says.


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Larger villages identified as places that could expand are also unlikely to get the extra housing because of issues over access to land and ownership issues.

Of 31 sites housing could be built on in Shipdham, for example, only 13 have been found to be 'suitable, achievable and viable'.

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Other villages facing similar problems are Necton, North Elmham, Old Buckenham and Saham Toney.

Ten homes planned for Weeting have been ruled out because of the presence of the protected stone curlew species.

The report, on strategic housing land availability, was due before Breckland Council's policy development and review panel 1 yesterday.

It states: “It is clear that the majority of this development will take place beyond 2019 as infrastructure constraints are overcome that are essential to allow these sites to come forward for development.

“This is particularly notable in Thetford and Attleborough where there are significant timing and cumulative capacity issues.”

It added that there was significant land with potential for being developed in the district's other market towns, including Swaffham and Watton.

The report is due to be used as part of the council's new local development framework, a planning blueprint setting out policy on where homes and businesses can be built in the district up to 2026.

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