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Rosemary Musker students lead in climate change

PUBLISHED: 15:42 08 October 2009 | UPDATED: 21:43 07 July 2010

It is well documented that climate change is top of the agenda for most governments, and now a Norfolk school has pledged to lead by example and show political bigwigs the way forward.

It is well documented that climate change is top of the agenda for most governments, and now a Norfolk school has pledged to lead by example and show political bigwigs the way forward.

Rosemary Musker High School in Thetford was one of the first 10 schools in Britain to pledge a reduction of carbon emissions by 10pc by the end of 2010.

The 10:10 campaign was launched at the Tate Modern in London, and alongside the schools were hospitals, councils, celebrities and other organisations.

Headteacher of Rosemary Musker High, Gill Price, assistant head teacher, said the initiative was student-led, with staff being reminded to make small changes such as switching off lights and not leaving computers on standby.

Mrs Price added: “I can tell staff to switch off and close down but when it comes from students it's more meaningful. The children need to be aware they can do their bit to reduce waste and energy consumption.

“They need to be aware it's their future and their children's future and by getting involved and making changes they can contribute in their small way and if they can all do it it'll have a big impact.”

A total of 16 councils, one police force, nearly 16,000 individuals and more than 600 businesses, including Royal mail, Tottenham Hotspur Football Club and the Tate Modern have all signed up to the climate change campaign.

The schools arm of 10:10 is led by ActionAid, one of the UK's largest international development agencies, and has offered a free starter pack to assist teachers in the run up to climate talks in Copenhagen in December.

Schools are being asked to create “sand and dust” messages to represent the land turning into dust in east Africa which will then be sent to Ed Miliband , secretary of state for the department for energy and climate change.

Janet Convery, head of schools and youth at ActionAid said: “We are very inspired to see how schoolchildren really do care, not only about their environment but also how climate change is already having such devastating effects on the lives of their peers in the developing world.

“I am sure that with the help of the CountDown to Copenhagen resources, thousands of young people will be able to add their voice to this debate in the run up to what is possibly the most important summit this decade.”


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