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Fighter jets from RAF Lakenheath to increase night flying exercises

PUBLISHED: 10:38 01 September 2020 | UPDATED: 11:41 01 September 2020

Night flying is expected as F-15E fighter jets from RAF Lakenheath take part in a training exercise. Picture: US Air Force/ Airman 1st Class Jessi Monte

Night flying is expected as F-15E fighter jets from RAF Lakenheath take part in a training exercise. Picture: US Air Force/ Airman 1st Class Jessi Monte

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People across Suffolk and Norfolk could experience some disturbances during September as US fighter jets take to the skies for overnight training exercises.

Night flights will take place involving aircraft from the US Air Force bases at RAF Lakenheath. Picture: AIRMAN 1ST CLASS MADELINE HERZOGNight flights will take place involving aircraft from the US Air Force bases at RAF Lakenheath. Picture: AIRMAN 1ST CLASS MADELINE HERZOG

The 48th Fighter Wing, which is based at RAF Lakenheath, will be increasing its operations over East Anglia and the surrounding area from Tuesday, September 8 to Thursday, September 10 and again from Monday, September 14 to Thursday, September 17.

The fighter jets will be conducting limited night time flying across these days to provide both aircrew and support personnel the experience needed to maintain a ready force capable of ensuring the collective defence of the NATO alliance.

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There are no plans for low-altitude flying in East Anglia or the surrounding regions and all training will be conducted in accordance with Ministry of Defence and UK airspace regulations.

During these periods, residents in East Anglia and the surrounding regions may see and hear US aircraft taking off, landing and moving between RAF Lakenheath and training ranges over the North Sea.

This will take place several times between 7pm and 10.30pm and overland flying will be limited as much as possible between sunset and sunrise.

Colonel Jason Camilletti, 48th Fighter Wing commander, said: “We must train like we fight in order to maintain operational readiness, and night flying is a critical muscle we must continue to flex.

“We understand the disturbance this may cause to our local communities, and appreciate the patience and understanding as we ensure our airmen remain trained and ready to secure the sovereign skies anytime, day or night.”


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