One-eyed horse star of new photo book

A one-eyed horse that was rehabilitated at a Norfolk rescue centre is set for national fame after being immortalised in print by an award-winning photographer.

A one-eyed horse that was rehabilitated at a Norfolk rescue centre is set for national fame after being immortalised in print by an award-winning photographer.

A stunning image of Laddy, a ten-year-old welsh cob from World Horse Welfare, is one of a series of portraits featured in a new equine book by Tim Flach.

The London-based artist visited the charity's rehabilitation centre at Snetterton last year to photograph the one-eyed horse to symbolise the welfare side of a seven-year project aimed at illustrating man's influence on horses.

Laddy's portrait is set to go on sale later this month when the photographer's book, Equus, is released on October 13.


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The welsh cob, who lost his right eye as a result of an injury, arrived at World Horse Welfare - formally the ILPH - in July 2005 after a call for help from his seriously ill owner who was finding it increasingly difficult to cope.

After a period of rehabilitation by staff at Hall Farm in Snetterton, Laddy spent a term at Otley College, in Ipswich, before being rehomed by Maxine Debenham from Thetford in April this year as part of the charity's loan scheme.

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Hannah Rowley, public relations officer for World Horse Welfare, said Laddy behaved “impeccably”, despite spending half a day in front of flashing cameras for the photo shoot.

“He is brilliant and having one eye does not affect him in the slightest,” she said.

Mr Flach, who travelled across the globe for his Equus book, added: “The series of shots in which Laddy appears shows how man can affect the horse and the responsibility we have towards their welfare.

“The image is very emotive and raises the question of what happened to Laddy, as well as the important work World Horse Welfare does to look after horses like him.”

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