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He's got a face ON the back of a bus!

PUBLISHED: 10:00 17 April 2008 | UPDATED: 21:03 07 July 2010

Having a face like the back of a bus is not to be celebrated.

But having your face on the back of a bus is fast becoming a must-do in Norfolk.

Following hot on the heels of Sgt Ed Brown's starring role on 142 buses to publicise Norfolk's safer neighbourhood teams, UEA is the latest organisation to harness the power of public transport.

Having a face like the back of a bus is not to be celebrated.

But having your face on the back of a bus is fast becoming a must-do in Norfolk.

Following hot on the heels of Sgt Ed Brown's starring role on 142 buses to publicise Norfolk's safer neighbourhood teams, UEA is the latest organisation to harness the power of public transport.

Ten former students born and raised in Norfolk will have their faces on the back of buses across the county in a bid to encourage more local people to raise their sights by going into higher education.

The mobile adverts include UEA alumni hailing from Thetford, Dereham, Bradwell, Cromer, Norwich, Gorleston and Heacham. They will be seen on routes taking in Norwich, King's Lynn, Lowestoft and Yarmouth.

UEA bosses hope the advertising drive will boost the higher education participation rate in Norfolk, which is one of the lowest in the country.

The adverts will also appear at bus stops and in newspapers, and will include details of the courses they studied and what job their degree has led them into.

One of the “faces”, 31-year-old Colin Goffin, went to school in Norwich and studied English literature at UEA, where he also completed his PGCE teaching qualification. He is now assistant headteacher at Benjamin Britten High School in Lowestoft.

He said: “I was offered my first job through my PGCE placement and was grateful for the local contacts the school offered. There is a good student life and non-academic side at UEA, offering a variety of opportunities. I know that when taking on a trainee teacher from UEA I can expect a strong candidate who will be reliable and well-supported.”

Amy Turner, 25, grew up in Cromer and started her American studies course at UEA in 2001. She now works as a business support development manager at the Prince's Trust in Norwich.

She said: “For financial reasons I wanted to stay in the area. I enjoyed all aspects of my degree, especially the opportunity to study abroad. I really liked the compact campus, the architecture and the homely atmosphere. I would encourage others to study at UEA to increase their expectations of their achievements.”

The campaign adds to UEA's efforts to encourage progression into higher education, including residential summer schools for years nine, 10 and 11, providing opportunities for gifted and talented students, and one-to-one mentoring opportunities to more than 300 Norfolk secondary and sixth forms students.

UEA's director of marketing and communications Alan Preece said: “We have found that the most powerful advocates for higher education are ex-students and we believe that graduates from Norfolk are the best people to persuade others in the region to consider the benefits of higher education.”

Among the other featured former students is Samantha Lines, 29, who grew up in Norwich and wanted her degree to fit in with her life in Norfolk.

She was keen to study at UEA, as it is renowned for environmental sciences, and she started her course in 1996. She now works as a report manager for Yarmouth firm Gardline Environmental.

“I would recommend that other local students consider UEA for the best of both worlds - staying close to home but benefiting from what goes on there.”

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