Greedy bird getting more common!

One of Britain's greediest birds is becoming a more common sight in our gardens, according to new figures.The common woodpigeon has leapfrogged the robin for the first time in the British Trust for Ornithology's (BTO) Garden BirdWatch survey.

One of Britain's greediest birds is becoming a more common sight in our gardens, according to new figures.

The common woodpigeon has leapfrogged the robin for the first time in the British Trust for Ornithology's (BTO) Garden BirdWatch survey.

The large grey bird, which vacuums up large quantities of seeds, nuts, shoots and buds, was reported in 85pc of gardens between April and June this year.

The woodpigeon is now third in the top ten list of common garden birds behind the blackbird and blue tit and just ahead of the red-breasted robin.


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Officials from the Thetford-based bird research organisation say that the quarterly figures do not reflect a decline in robin populations, but an increase in the number of woodpigeons that visit our gardens in search of food.

The less than popular bird has gone from being reported in 66pc of participating gardens in 1995 to 85pc in 2008.

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The BTO has now brought out a leaflet about the woodpigeon with information on its feeding habits, what types of seed they like and dislike, and when and how they use gardens.

Paul Stancliffe, from the BTO Garden BirdWatch team, said: “Whether you love them or hate them, woodpigeons are an increasingly common sight in our gardens, and it might seem that you have little choice when it comes to them using your garden.” “This isn't quite true; Woodpigeons come in search of seed and have a real preference for the type of seed mixes that are put out. Anything with a high cereal content will prove to be very attractive to them.”

For a free copy of the woodpigeon leaflet, call the BTO on 01842 750050.

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