Going for gold with Olympic plants

THE first of 300,000 wetland plants grown in Norfolk for the riverside area of the Olympic stadium in London have been planted.

THE first of 300,000 wetland plants grown in Norfolk for the riverside area of the Olympic stadium in London have been planted.

Salix River and Wetland Services in Croxton, near Thetford, is one of 77 businesses in the east of England which secured lucrative contracts to help create the sporting venues Olympic village and parklands as part of the �9bn London games.

More than 30 species of native reeds, rushes, grasses, sedges, wildflowers, and irises have been maturing in waterbeds and pallets near Thetford at the largest wetland plant nursery in Europe.

The first of these have now been laid by Minister of Sport and the Olympics Hugh Robertson, television gardener Charlie Dimmock, Olympic gold medal winner Jonathan Edwards and children from the Olympic Park construction crew.


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The new reed beds are being created in a large wetland bowl north of the Olympic Park which was formerly a 100 year old landfill site.

Guests will be able to watch the action on big screens and in future the riverside area will become a space for people and wildlife which will also help protect 5,000 properties in the area from flooding.

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Natural England director for South East England Alan Law said: “The Olympic Park is a great example of how an industrial environment can be transformed to meet the needs of people and wildlife and create new opportunities for health, recreation and enjoyment. London 2012 is well on the road to realising a unique green legacy.”

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