Developer withdraws plans for 190 new homes

Gladman withdrew its application to build 190 homes in East Harling prior to Breckland's planning co

Gladman withdrew its application to build 190 homes in East Harling prior to Breckland's planning committee meeting. Picture: Antony Kelly - Credit: copyright ARCHANT 2017

An application to build almost 200 homes has been withdrawn at the 11th hour.

Part of the land off Lopham Road in East Harling which developer Gladman had earmarked for 190 homes

Part of the land off Lopham Road in East Harling which developer Gladman had earmarked for 190 homes. Picture: Google Maps - Credit: Archant

Gladman Developments had earmarked land off Lopham Road in East Harling for a major housing development which, if approved, would have added up to 190 homes to the village.

The developer was initially looking to build 198 properties, but slightly scaled back its proposal after taking into account local feedback.

In its revised application, Gladman pledged to provide 25pc affordable housing, an extension to a nearby woodland cemetery and a new children's play area.

It also said it would contribute more than £70,000 towards medical facilities in the area following approval, while also offering funds towards education provision.

The Cheshire-based homebuilder was, however, dealt a major blow when Capita - Breckland Council's outsourced planning department - recommended the scheme's refusal on the grounds of its design and placement.


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And ahead of a planning committee meeting on Monday, September 30, it was revealed Gladman had decided to completely withdraw its application from the planning register.

Jon Berry, head of development management at Capita, said: "This application cannot be considered by the planning committee because it has been withdrawn.

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"No reason has been given and the applicant is not obliged to do so.

"The application cannot be heard today and, in fact, it cannot be heard at all because it has been fully withdrawn from the planning register."

In a report submitted to the committee prior to Monday's meeting, case officer Fiona Hunter wrote that the development would result in "harmful urban intrusion" into adjacent countryside.

She added: "Due to the location's flat, tranquil and rural nature - which allows for expansive views - the sizeable development would result in significant harm to the rural approach to, and setting of, the village."

The proposal had been met with ardent opposition from villagers, with more than 520 people submitting reasons for refusal to the council.

In addition to concerns over loss of countryside, objectors highlighted a lack of parking in the village and a strain on educational and medical facilities in the area.

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